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The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
  • 125 West Bay Road
  • Amherst, MA 01002
Hours
  • Mon. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
  • Saturday 10am – 5pm
  • Sunday 12pm – 5pm

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Past Exhibitions

Eric Carle

Traveling

Eric Carle: Animals and Friends

September 12, 2015 – January 3, 2016

Montclair Art Museum, Montclair, NJ

 

IN THE West Gallery

Brown Bear Turns 50

Published in 1967, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? had an immediate appeal to children and adults alike. Bill Martin Jr’s rhythmic call-and-response text builds anticipation at each turn of the page, while Eric Carle’s bold graphics and parade of animals encourage learning and imagination. Brown Bear has been translated into 31 languages—from Arabic to Vietnamese—and has sold 16 million copies. In addition to the original 1967 book, Carle re-illustrated editions in 1970, 1984, and 1992.

Artwork from every page of the famous book is on display, as well as a selection of Carle’s collages from additional collaborations with Martin. One of only two surviving collages from the 1967 edition—Brown Bear himself—has been faithfully restored and is on view for the first time.

Click here for events and programming related to this exhibition. 

This exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Hsin-Yi Foundation, with additional support from Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

 

IN THE Offsite

Brown Bear Everywhere

In celebration of the upcoming 50th anniversary of the picture book that launched Eric Carle’s career—Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin Jr —The Carle is sending the book’s famous characters to the main streets and outdoor spaces of Amherst. This special pop-up exhibition, Brown Bear Everywhere, brings 14 high-quality reproductions of Carle’s original collage illustrations to some of Amherst’s popular restaurants, schools, and recreational sites.

Click here to learn more about Brown Bear.

Support for this exhibition is generously provided by Macmillan Children’s Publishing Group.

 

Illustration © 1992 by Eric Carle

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Hide and Seek

Eric Carle has made many pieces of unforgettable art during a 50-year career that includes more than 70 books. Unbeknownst to most readers, however, Carle has left behind a trail of “Easter eggs” in his illustrations, and in doing so has created a subtext of secret allusions. He often hides “C” and “R” in his images, denoting the first letters of his children’s names. “A few times,” he says, “I have even incorporated the names of friends into my books; these names will be hard to find; they are camouflaged.”

This exhibition entices visitors to take a closer look at Carle’s art to uncover these hidden references. Flip labels reveal some of the people and places important to him.

This exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Hsin-Yi Foundation.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Animals Animals [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1989 Eric Carle.

Traveling

I See a Story: The Art of Eric Carle

April 2, 2016 – January 8, 2017

High Museum of Art, Atlanta, GA

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Tiny Seed [Picture Book Studio/Simon & Schuster]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1987 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: From A to Z

For nearly fifty years, Eric Carle’s picture books have been internationally recognized for their vibrant images and distinctive collage techniques. His stories are charming, but they’re layered with learning too. As children read Carle’s books about animals, families, and fables, they also learn their colors, numbers, and letters.

Carle recognizes the creative and inquisitive nature of children and he wants to—in his own words—“show them that learning is really both fascinating and fun.” This exhibition introduces the ABCs of Carle’s own colorful career. It explores his themes, personal interests, and artistic techniques. Some of his most familiar characters are showcased alongside artworks on view for the first time.

This exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Hsin-Yi Foundation.

 

Illustration from 1,2,3, TO THE ZOO: A COUNTING BOOK BY ERIC CARLE © 1968 by Eric Carle

IN THE West Gallery

Eric Carle: The Nonsense Show

Strange things are happening in Eric Carle’s studio. A rabbit pulls a boy from a hat. A mouse takes a cat for a walk. While such preposterous scenarios are common in nursery rhymes (remember the cow that jumped over the moon?), Carle invents his own visual puzzles in his latest book, The Nonsense Show. Scheduled for release in October, the book is Carle’s ode to Surrealism and his love of all things silly and imaginative. He creates absurd situations—a leopard tiger, a duck with human feet—that promise to spark conversation and make his readers wonder and laugh.

 

Traveling

The Art of Eric Carle: Feathers, Fins, and Fur

August 24 – October 3, 2015

Marxhausen Gallery of Art, Concordia University, Seward, NE

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Does a Kangaroo Have a Mother Too? [HarperCollins]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2000 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Bees, Butterflies, and Other Bugs

As a child, Eric Carle became interested in insects, a curiosity sparked by his father, who took him on walks in the woods and fields, exploring the tiny creatures that lived there. In Eric’s own words, “I remember the excitement of lifting stones or peeling back the bark of dead trees to discover the living things that crawled, crept, and scurried about there.” In Bees, Butterflies, and Other Bugs, The Museum celebrates the wings, stings, and crawling things that have appeared throughout Carle's career, ranging from allergy tab advertisements he created in the late 1960s to familiar picture book favorites including The Very Hungry Caterpillar and The Grouchy Ladybug.

Click here for events and programming related to this exhibition. 

This exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Hsin-Yi Foundation.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Lamb and the Butterfly [Orchard Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1988 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Re-Imaged and Re-Imagined

Over the past 45 years, several of Eric Carle’s books have been republished, providing Eric with an opportunity to re-imagine some of his earlier illustrations. The pairings on view in this exhibition highlight works that Carle chose to re-illustrate for new editions alongside previous ones. They tell not only the rich stories of the books they come from, but also of Carle’s evolving style and techniques.

 

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle & Friends: What's Your Favorite Animal?

Eric Carle has partnered with fourteen leading illustrators to answer the enduring question, “What’s your favorite animal?" in a new book published by Henry Holt and Company. Contributions range from meticulously rendered artwork to quick, funny sketches with equally varied commentaries. The book, and this complementary exhibition, is a colorful, varied, and engaging omnibus that offers real insight into the lives and personalities of the artists. Contributors are Nick Bruel, Eric Carle, Lucy Cousins, Susan Jeffers, Steven Kellogg, Jon Klassen, Tom Lichtenheld, Peter McCarty, Chris Raschka, Peter Sis, Lane Smith, Erin Stead, Rosemary Wells, and Mo Willems. All royalties from the sale of the book benefit The Carle.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for What's Your Favorite Animal? [Henry Holt and Company]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2014 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Friends

Eric Carle's newest picture book Friends from Philomel Books published in November 2013, is a celebration of friendship and childhood expressed in colorful tissue paper collage illustrations and the poetic story of an imaginary journey of the child at play. Inspired by Eric Carle's memories of early friendships he had as a young child as well as friendships in his adult life, Friends is a testament to the importance of friendship for children and to the lasting bonds that remain through every stage in life.
 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Friends [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2013 Eric Carle.

IN THE East Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Feathers, Fins and Fur

Eric Carle’s love of nature is legendary. To recognize this passion, the Carle is organizing a selective survey of works exploring his interest in animals. On view will be a host of animals who have populated his books. In addition to finished collages, there will be preliminary works including pencil studies that underscore Carle’s meticulous study of his subject.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for A Very Long Train [Thomas Y. Crowell]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1972 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Beyond Books: The Independent Art of Eric Carle

Eric Carle is primarily known for The Very Hungry Caterpillar and over 70 picture books done in his colorful collage technique. For the first time, fans will have a chance to see the remarkable variety of paintings, sculptures, and personal sketches that he has been making privately for more than 60 years. Starting with his career as a poster artist in the 1940s and carrying through to the street photographs he is shooting today, this exhibition, Beyond Books: The Independent Art of Eric Carle, provides viewers a chance to see what Eric himself calls his “ArtArt.” This selection provides a surprisingly intimate window into the full range of his imagination and talents. The categories include: 1) Early posters and book jackets; 2) Linoleum cuts: created for several adult titles by other authors. 3) Caricature notes: funny and irreverent hand-drawn notes written to friends. 4) Non-representational art or “Art Art:” abstract painted tissue paper collages created between picture book projects. 5)“Name Art:” names of close friends and colleagues captured in his famous painted tissue paper. 6) Metal sculptures/Glass sculptures: forays into three-dimensional realms, including metal sculptures and painted glass assemblages in collusion with his friend and renowned glass artist Tom Patti. 7) Costumes/Drawings: costumes and a set for The Magic Flute stage concert performed by The Springfield Symphony in 2001. 8) Photographic street art: Studies in colors, shapes, and textures, Carle’s recent “found art” photographs have their roots early in his career. 9) A large Tyvek mural (approximately 10 x 20’) for other participating venues.

 

Eric Carle, Kimono I, 2001. © Eric Carle.

Traveling

Beyond Books: The Independent Art of Eric Carle

April 6 – July 7, 2012

Tacoma Art Museum, Tacoma, WA

 

Eric Carle, Ribbon II, 1998. © Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: The Birth of a Book and a Museum

2012 will mark two ten-year anniversaries for Eric Carle—the opening of the Museum and the publication of “Slowly, Slowly, Slowly,” said the Sloth. To mark these events, the Museum will put art from the sloth book on view from April 3 until September 2, 2012.

For Eric Carle many of the ideas that he shapes into books come from his own experience. It was his involvement in the creation of this Museum that actually led him to create a book about a sloth. In 2000-2001, weeks and months of thinking, planning, meetings, and decision-making had him going at a hectic pace. Finally, he said, “Enough!” In his studio, with a “Do Not Disturb” sign on the door, he decided to seek out something completely opposite from the frantic life he had been living. It was there he discovered the sloth. The slow pace of this animal’s existence sent a powerful message to Eric: we need to slow our lives down.

The story began to emerge slowly, slowly, slowly. He began by investigating the habitat of the sloth and learned about the animals that lived around this lethargic creature. Through the process of creating mock-up books, or “dummies” as they are called, he continually revised the story. On view is only a small selection of these working drafts. In addition, he revised the actual art several times. Also on exhibit are some of his designs for the dust jacket as well as a selection of earlier versions of some of the book’s pages.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for "Slowly, Slowly, Slowly," said the Sloth [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2002 Eric Carle.

Traveling

Fins and Feathers: Original Children's Book Illustration from The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

December 2011 – March 2012

Figge Art Museum, Davenport, IA

 

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse

In anticipation of the October 2011 publication of Eric Carle’s latest book, The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, the Museum will be exhibiting its original art beginning September 20, 2011 and remaining on view until March 20, 2012. Executed in his signature colorfully-designed collage technique, the book encourages the young artist to let his/her imagination run free. The story takes inspiration from an episode in Carle’s German school days when he was invited by his art teacher Fridolin Kraus to see the work of artists deemed “degenerate” by the Nazi regime. Among these artists was the German Expressionist Franz Marc, who painted horses blue. It was this subjectivity that had such a galvanizing effect and led to Carle’s determination to become an artist.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2011 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Family and Friends

To mark the 40th anniversary of the publication of Do You Want to Be My Friend? The Carle has mounted an exhibition featuring the theme of friendship. This book is dedicated to Eric’s boyhood friend from Syracuse, Carlton Mayer. Despite an almost 20-year hiatus, this friendship remained true, and they re-united when Eric returned to America in 1952. Because of the important theme of friendship, Eric has long acknowledged this book as his favorite. To celebrate this anniversary a group of works from this book and several others where friendship is an underlying theme are on view. In some cases these bonds are between people, as in The Tiny Seed (1987); in others, such as The Lamb and Butterfly (1988), animals befriend each other. In a recent book, Where Are You Going? To See My Friend (2002), friendship connects two cultures—Japan and America. And finally, it seemed appropriate to point out the folly of not wanting friendship, so wonderfully captured in The Grouchy Ladybug (1977).

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Do You Want to Be My Friend? [HarperCollins]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1971 Eric Carle.

Traveling

Fins and Feathers: Selections from the Permanent Collection of The Eric Carle Museum

November 7, 2010 – January 30, 2011

North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC

 

IN THE West Gallery

Eric Carle: A Feast for the Eyes

Join us for a smorgasbord of picture book art that explores the unique role food plays throughout children’s literature. The works of Eric Carle, as well as the works of other artists from our permanent collection, illustrate a range of themes, from food as basic sustenance to food as the center of family social life. For Carle, for example, food has been a leitmotif — famously, a caterpillar storing up food for its transformation into a butterfly, and with equal determination, a little boy making pancakes truly from scratch. Additional events highlighting the exhibits are planned in our reading library, auditorium, and art studio.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Watch Out! A Giant! [Collins World]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1978 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Eric Carle: Prints and Papers

This exhibition explores some of Eric Carle’s early printmaking. From his days in advertising, Eric employed linoleum cuts among other media to achieve a visual variety. Some of his first books in which he used the lino-cut technique reflect his emphasis on bold shape and design so associated with his collage technique, albeit without the color. Work from his early and later books are shown together in a thematically and stylistically connected display.

 

Eric Carle, Linocut block for All About Arthur (an absolutely absurd ape) [Franklin Watts]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1974 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

80/40: Continuing the Celebration and Exploring the Undersea World of Eric Carle

The Carle continues its celebration of Eric Carle's 80th birthday and the 40th anniversary of the publication of The Very Hungry Caterpillar with a new installation of work from this remarkable book. As well, in conjunction with Picture Book Theater’s productions based on A House for Hermit Crab and Mister Seahorse, examples from these two books are on view. To augment this aquatic theme, marine subjects from the permanent collection by Norman Gorbaty and Peter Sìs have also been put on exhibit.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Mister Seahorse [Philomel/Putnam]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2004 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

80/40: Celebrating the Birthdays of Eric Carle and The Very Hungry Caterpillar

In celebration of Eric Carle’s 80th Birthday and the 40th Anniversary of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, the Museum has organized a special exhibition that chronicles both Eric’s life and career. From his childhood art and advertising work to some of the history behind the creation of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, the visitor will experience the full spectrum of Eric’s creative genius.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Very Hungry Caterpillar [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1969, 1987 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Selections from The Art of Eric Carle: The Rooster Who Set Out to See the World and The Very Lonely Firefly

As one of the most acclaimed authors and illustrators of our time, Eric Carle’s work has world-wide appeal. Images, including those from The Rooster Who Set Out to See the World and The Very Lonely Firefly, will explore the evolution of Carle’s collage technique with particular attention to his use of shape and color. This exhibition will also feature other insights into Carle’s creative process, including examples of his non-book art, as well as recent acquisitions from the Museum’s permanent collection.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Rooster Who Set Out to See the World [Franklin Watts]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1972 Eric Carle.

Traveling

The Art of Eric Carle

April 29 – May 12, 2008: Tokyo Matsuya Ginza, Tokyo, Japan
September 19, – November 3, 2008: Shimane Art Museum, Matsue, Japan
November 29 – December 28, 2008: JR Kyoto Isetan, Kyoto, Japan
April 3 – May 6, 2009: Sogo Museum of Art, Yokohama, Japan

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for 10 Little Rubber Ducks [HarperCollins]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2005 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Selections from The Art of Eric Carle: Bears and Beyond

As one of the most acclaimed authors and illustrators of our time, Eric Carle’s work has world-wide appeal. Selections from The Art of Eric Carle: Bears and Beyond explores the evolution of Carle’s collage technique, highlighting his collaboration with Bill Martin Jr. On view for the first time will be the art created for Martin’s last manuscript, Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? This exhibition will also feature other insights into Carle’s creative process, including examples of his non-book art, as well as recent acquisitions from the Museum’s permanent collection.

Support for this exhibition is provided in part by Henry Holt Books for Young Readers.

 

Eric Carle, Final cover illustration for Baby Bear, Baby Bear, What Do You See? by Bill Martin, Jr. [Henry Holt and Company]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2007 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Eric Carle Picture Writer

As one of the most acclaimed authors and illustrators of our time, Eric Carle’s work has world-wide appeal. Selections from Eric Carle Picture Writer explore the sources of some of Carle’s stories, his highly acclaimed collage technique, and a small glimpse at some of the preliminary stages involved in the creation of a book. This exhibition will also feature examples of Carle’s non-book art, as well as recent acquisitions from the Museum’s permanent collection.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for 10 Little Rubber Ducks [HarperCollins]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2005 Eric Carle.

Traveling

The Art of Eric Carle

October 17, 2006 – January 21, 2007

Tacoma Museum of Art, Tacoma, WA

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Grouchy Ladybug [HarperCollins]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1977 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle

 

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Dragons Dragons & Other Creatures That Never Were [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1991 Eric Carle.

Traveling

The Wonderful World of Eric Carle

May 13 – August 13, 2006

Orlando Museum of Art, Orlando, FL

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See? [Henry Holt and Company]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2003 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Panda Bear, Panda Bear, What Do You See? [Henry Holt and Company]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2003 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle

 

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Dragons Drags & Other Creatures That Never Were [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1991 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle

“Where do ideas come from?” This question is perhaps the one most often asked of Eric Carle. As one of his young fans stated, “They come from your inside and the outside.” And, so it is with Eric Carle. The art in this exhibition reflects a love of nature born of young Eric’s walks in the forest with his father. In addition to drawing upon his own experiences, Carle is also able to reach out to children through what might seem like a random event to most of us—a crate of rubber toys falling off a freighter in the middle of the ocean—the inspiration for his latest book, Ten Little Rubber Ducks.

In celebration of the 200th birthday of Hans Christian Andersen, there are also examples of how Carle has transformed Andersen’s elaborately descriptive words into pictures using his collage technique.

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for 10 Little Rubber Ducks [HarperCollins]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2005 Eric Carle.

Traveling

The Wonderful World of Eric Carle

October 6, 2004 – February 20, 2005

Naturalis National Museum of Natural History, Leiden, The Netherlands

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for A House for Hermit Crab [Picture Book Studio/Simon & Schuster]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1987 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Chip Has Many Brothers [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1983 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Art of Eric Carle: Eric's 75th and The Very Hungry Caterpillar's 35th Birthday

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Very Hungry Caterpillar [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1969, 1987 Eric Carle.

Traveling

The Many Worlds of Eric Carle

March 6 – 30, 2004: International Library of Children’s Literature, Tokyo, Japan
April 7 – May 9, 2004: Shimonoseki Art Museum, Yamaguchi, Japan
May 19 – June 3, 2004: Daimaru Museum, Osaka, Japan
June 8 – July 4, 2004: Niitsu Museum of Art, Niigata, Japan
July 16 – August 22, 2004: Yorozu Tetsugoro Museum, Iwate, Japan
August 25 – September 26, 2004: Tendo City Museum of Art, Yamagata, Japan
October 2 – 24, 2004: Hachino-he Museum of Art, Aomori, Japan

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Where Are You Going? To See My Friend! by Kazuo Iwamura [Doshin-sha Publishing Company]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2001 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Selections from The Art of Eric Carle: Beginning with Bears

As one of the most acclaimed authors and illustrators of our time, Eric Carle’s work has world-wide appeal. Selections from the Art of Eric Carle: Beginning with Bears explores the evolution of Carle’s collage technique beginning with examples of works created to illustrate his first book, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?, written by Bill Martin, Jr. This exhibition will also feature examples of Carle’s non-book art as well as recent acquisitions from the Museum’s permanent collection.

 

Eric Carle, Final cover illustration for Polar Bear, Polar Bear, What Do You Hear? [Henry Holt and Company LLC]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1991 Eric Carle.

Traveling

Out and About: The Many Worlds of Eric Carle

The National Center for Children's Illustrated Literature (NCCIL), Abilene, TX

Eric Carle, Final illustration for 1, 2, 3 to the Zoo [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1987 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Eric Carle: A Carnival of Animals

A Carnival of Animals provides viewers with a glimpse into Eric Carle's interest and curiosity about the natural world. His childhood memories of long walks in the woods with his father, and summers spent on the farms of German relatives are the sources of inspiration for many of these works. As you explore nature through these images, examine your own connection to these simple yet enduring messages. Look or animals that make you smile, teach a lesson, provide a moral, or share a nugget of wisdom. 

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for Twelve Tales From Aesop [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1980 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

Out and About: The Many Worlds of Eric Carle

Out and About: The Worlds of Eric Carle brings together work from one of his earliest books 1, 2, 3 to the Zoo to a comprehensive look at one of his most recent books, "Slowly, slowly, slowly," said the Sloth. The display invites the viewer to witness Eric Carle's methodical process. Zoo, as well as From Head to Toe, Have you Seen My Cat?, and Watch Out! A Giant!, offer teaching opportunities for numbers, parts of the body, and how to look carefully at a work of art. 

This exhibition is made possible through generous support of Carter's. 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for "Slowly, slowly, slowly," said the Sloth [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 2002 Eric Carle.

IN THE West Gallery

The Colorful World of Eric Carle

This in-depth retrospective featuring 52 works from many of Eric Carle’s best-loved books launches an ongoing series of thematic exhibitions and surveys of Eric Carle’s distinguished career. 

 

Eric Carle, Final illustration for The Very Hungry Caterpillar [Philomel Books]. Collection of Eric and Barbara Carle. © 1969, 1987 Eric Carle.
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