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The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
  • 125 West Bay Road
  • Amherst, MA 01002

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  • Tuesday- Friday10 am - 4 pm
  • Saturday 10am – 5pm
  • Sunday 12 pm - 5 pm

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Making Art Together

Cardboard and Found Materials Flower Display

 

Like other installations and displays we’ve created in the Art Studio, this project was conceived when I found something in the recycling bin. This time my plunder included a stack of corrugated cardboard rounds. Once used between stacked bowls or plates as a protective layer, these screamed “flowers” from the moment I spotted them.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

To make this vision become a reality, I enlisted the help of our amazing student assistant, Katie Welles. After sharing with her my idea to incorporate a variety of different “found” texures in a small garden of flowers, we gathered the cardboard inserts and some flower inspiration sources, including cut flowers and Some Bugs by Angela DiTerlizzi, Illustrated by Brendan Wenzel. Collecting more materials from our studio's stock of found materials, Katie contructed the flowers by working a couple of hours a week for about a month.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

For the stems we gathered fallen sticks and twigs, coated them with tempera paint in different green hues, and attached them to the flower heads with wire and hot glue.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

Paper plates covered with shredded paper turned out to be a great way to add texture and dimension to the center of one of the large blue flowers. Katie painted the back/smooth side of bubble wrap with acrylic paint to make the center of the red/orange flower and painted newspaper became some of the leaves.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

Katie also crafted the lily of the valley-like flowers out of foam egg cartons and wire and daffodil-like flowers out of large coffee filters and cardboard egg cartons.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

When we had all the flowers nearly complete we pushed them into a thick rectangle of rigid insulation foam we had left over from another project. They also could have worked in tall, heavy vases.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

Katie finished the flowers just in time for her graduation from Smith College. Looking up at them above the cabinets makes me appreciate collaboration and how much creativity our awesome Art Studio staff bring to our work in the Art Studio.

Cardboard and Found Materials Flowers | Making Art with Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

We hope you're inspired to use found materials wonder, problem-solve, and inspire others around you! Look for more ideas for using found materials in the found materials section of our blog.

 

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We enjoy exploring materials and ideas in the Art Studio, and we’re excited to share our process with you! Please consider the following factors when adapting these posts for your learning environment: 

We facilitate a variety of programs within the Art Studio for a wide range of age groups. Please carefully consider the age appropriateness of each individual activity in your own learning environment.

Our projects are always done with adult supervision and proper safety precautions. Be sure all of your projects are overseen by adults who likewise follow proper safety precautions. The adults overseeing your project must also be responsible for handling or assisting with any potentially harmful equipment or materials. 

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art is not responsible for any damages, injuries or liabilities that result from any activities contained within this website, and we expressly disclaim any responsibility or liability therefor. From time to time, we reference materials that we have found to be particularly important in our projects. We do not receive any monetary compensation for recommending materials. 

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by Meghan Burch

This entry was posted on Monday, June 20th, 2016 at 9:00 am and is filed under By Meghan Burch, Displays & Window Shades, Found Materials. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.



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