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The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
  • 125 West Bay Road
  • Amherst, MA 01002

Hours

  • Wednesday-Friday10 am-3 pm
  • Saturday 10am – 4 pm
  • Sunday 12 pm - 4 pm

Closed Monday and Tuesday

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Making Art Together

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates

The Art Studio has a long history of offering texture rubbing plates to add visual texture to art work. We’ve used them to add interest to collage cats and birds, and in at least a few other collage projects. Doing texture rubbings with young children can be a bonding experience because they sometimes need another hand or two to help them!

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates | Making Art With Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

We love the idea of collecting rubbings from natural and manmade surfaces wherever they can be found, but sometimes that’s not practical. That's why the Art Studio has a large collection of both homemade and commercially made texture rubbing plates.

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates | Making Art With Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

We make our plates by gluing low-relief objects onto thin pieces of cardboard or chipboard. Our boards, pictured, are discards from a printer that we first used as painting blotters, and then cut down to about 5"x7".  

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates | Making Art With Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

The glue we use to adhere objects to the boards depends on what the objects are made from. White tacky glue works for paper and fabrics. Non-porous materials such as metal and plastic need something stronger. Hot glue sometimes works, but epoxy or something like Surebonder 9001 High Strength Adhesive are needed for a long-lasting durable bond. Texture plates that will be around young children who still put small objects in their mouths need a durable bond. Be sure to read the instructions and safety warnings on the epoxy type of of adhesives.

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates | Making Art With Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

We own a variety of commercially-available plastic rubbing plates including the Texture Rubbing Plates and the Optical Illusions Rubbing Plates from Nasco. We appreciate that they can be washed, but the ones we’ve made in the Art Studio have a little extra love in them and inspire our guests to make their own at home. 

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates | Making Art With Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

We avoid purchasing texture plates with images of objects or animals. Open-ended patterns and textures are can be turned into any kind of picture,  making them a better investment than representational images for nurturing creativity and imagination.

Homemade Texture Rubbing Plates | Making Art With Children | The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art

If you are inspired by this batch of homemade texture rubbing plates, check out how we made rubbing plates with natural materials!

Happy Creating!

 

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We enjoy exploring materials and ideas in the Art Studio, and we’re excited to share our process with you! Please consider the following factors when adapting these posts for your learning environment: 

We facilitate a variety of programs within the Art Studio for a wide range of age groups. Please carefully consider the age appropriateness of each individual activity in your own learning environment.

Our projects are always done with adult supervision and proper safety precautions. Be sure all of your projects are overseen by adults who likewise follow proper safety precautions. The adults overseeing your project must also be responsible for handling or assisting with any potentially harmful equipment or materials. 

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art is not responsible for any damages, injuries or liabilities that result from any activities contained within this website, and we expressly disclaim any responsibility or liability therefor. From time to time, we reference materials that we have found to be particularly important in our projects. We do not receive any monetary compensation for recommending materials. 

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by Meghan Burch

This entry was posted on Friday, May 13th, 2016 at 7:00 am and is filed under By Meghan Burch, Elementary School, Found Materials, Homemade Materials and Tools, Toddlers, Middle School, Paper, Preschool. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.



Comments

elissa
Tuesday, May 5, 2016 - 4:56 pm
loved it and sounds like it was fun and creative.

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